University of Pennsylvania logo

Twitter

Category: predictive modeling

Posted:
Oct 31, 2016

Author:
Emily S

Tags:

IBM wants to stop E. coli outbreaks before people die

Five years ago in Germany, a bland vegetable caused one of the more devastating outbreaks of food-born illness in recent years.  Fifty three people died and nearly 4,000 were hospitalized due to a particularly gnarly strain of E.coli. It caused bloody diarrhea and kidney failure in many people.  It...

Read More

Hunting the Genetic Signs of Postpartum Depression With an iPhone App

With mothers and medical providers clamoring for answers about postpartum depression, scientists are beginning a major effort to understand the genetic underpinnings of mood disorders that afflict millions of women during and after 

Read More

Posted:
Jul 30, 2015

Author:
Maggie

Tags:

IBM and CVS Health Want Watson to Manage Your Diabetes

If IBM and the recently rebranded CVS Health have their way, you’ll be using the Watson supercomputer to manage obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. The two companies are announcing a new partnership to develop custom care management services for CVS customers with chronic illnesses, and to then...

Read More

Posted:
Jul 27, 2015

Author:
Maggie

Tags:

Using Algorithms to Determine Character

Computers aren’t just doing hard math problems and showing us cat videos. Increasingly, they judge our character. Maybe we should be grateful. Link to full article

Read More

Posted:
Jul 10, 2015

Author:
Emily S

Tags:

Insurer Uses Patients’ Personal Data To Predict Who Will Get Sick

The first thing out of John Iovine’s mouth is an apology.  “You got to forgive me if I don’t remember too much,” he says. “I had a stroke.”  Signs of that stroke are everywhere — the bed in the dining room, a shower installed in the pantry. John is thin and sits in blue pajama pants in the...

Read More

Posted:
Apr 10, 2015

Author:
Emily S

Tags:

Web searches may predict disease risk among populations

Internet search data might someday help estimate the prevalence of non-communicable diseases like stroke, heart disease or cancer, a new study suggests.  Web searches are often linked with behavior, said Svetha Venkatesh, one of the study’s co-authors.  For example, a trip to the gym may be...

Read More

Posted:
May 27, 2014

Author:
Maggie

Tags:

Twitter to Release All Tweets to Scientists

Five hundred million tweets are broadcast worldwide every day on Twitter. With so many details about personal lives, the social media site is a data trove for scientists looking to find patterns in human behaviors, tease out risk factors for health conditions and track the spread of infectious...

Read More

Posted:
May 6, 2014

Author:
Maggie

Tags:

Going viral: How ‘social contagion’ begins and escalates

Understanding the roots of a global, contagious spread of online information may help better predict political revolutions, consumer behavior, box office revenues, public policy debates, and even public health epidemics, a new study co-led by Yale University reveals. The model devised for this...

Read More

Posted:
Apr 30, 2014

Author:
Maggie

Tags:

Predicting Social Trends Two Months in Advance

A new study from researchers at Yale, the University of California-San Diego, the Universidad Autónoma of Madrid, and NICTA of Australia, formulated a technique that they claim can forecast social media trends up to two months in advance.

Read More

Posted:
Apr 11, 2014

Author:
Maggie

Tags:

Disease Outbreak Warnings Via Social Media Sought by U.S.

Whooping cough first sickened the Illinois high school cheerleaders, then it struck the football players, the cross-country team and the band.

Read More

Pages

The Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation engages interdisciplinary teams to reimagine health care delivery for dramatically better value and patient outcomes.

The Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics (LDI) is Penn's center for research, policy analysis, and education in health systems. Its 200 Senior Fellows analyze the medical, economic, and social issues that influence how health care is organized, financed, managed, and delivered across the U.S.

We are passionate about pursuing impactful research and eager to explore opportunities that will enable a culture of social media and health innovation at Penn, Penn Medicine, and beyond.  Have an idea for a project?  Interested in collaboration?  Click here to learn more about how to contact us.