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Category: health tracking

Posted:
Nov 15, 2016

Author:
Emily S

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Women’s Health Apps Are Big Business

The startup world can be a boys’ club. Not only are women underrepresented as employees at technology companies and startups, but the tech itself seem to ignore the needs of women, too.

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Posted:
Nov 2, 2016

Author:
Christina

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Fitness Trackers Might Help Us Live Longer (if Only We Used Them)

Activity monitors could improve our health and extend our lives — if only we could be motivated to use them. Those are the conclusions of two new studies about the promise and perils of relying on fitness trackers to measure and guide how we move.

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Posted:
Aug 8, 2016

Author:
Remi

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Watch out, ladies: Your period-tracking app could be leaking personal data

For years, millions of women have used mobile apps to help track their menstrual cycles and get a better handle on their fertility. But now, it turns out, some of those apps may have been leaking this intimate information.

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Posted:
May 27, 2016

Author:
Emily S

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See That Billboard? It May See You, Too

Pass a billboard while driving in the next few months, and there is a good chance the company that owns it will know you were there and what you did afterward.  Clear Channel Outdoor Americas, which has tens of thousands of billboards across the United States, will announce on Monday that it has...

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Fitness Trackers Move to Earphones, Socks and Basketballs

Devices collect more kinds of data from more places, and one stores the energy from your movements for use to power your device.

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Posted:
May 9, 2016

Author:
Remi

Tags:

The Eliza App Makes Mental Health Tracking as Easy as Talking to Yourself

Makers of an app called Eliza want to make it as easy for people to track their psychological well-being as it is to track their physical fitness.  The Eliza app asks users to record a voice memo, say, venting about an issue they’re dealing with at work or simply reflecting on their day. The app...

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A Fitbit Saved His Life? Well, Maybe

Wearing a Fitbit?  If so, you already know that electronic fitness trackers can let you keep records on your smartphone of how many steps you've walked, how much you've slept, maybe your heart rate, or even where you've been.  But what can the gadget tell your doctor? A few things that are pretty...

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As Wearables in Workplace Spread, So Do Legal Concerns

Wearable devices, like the Fitbits and Apple Watches sported by runners and early adopters, are fast becoming tools in the workplace. These devices offer employers new ways to measure productivity and safety, and give insurers the ability to track workers’ health indicators and habits.

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Health Apps Often Lack Privacy Policies and Share Users' Data

March 8, 2016 – CHICAGO (Reuters). Just because a health app has a privacy policy doesn’t mean the data will remain private, an analysis of mobile tools for diabetes suggests. In fact, privacy policies appear rare, and when they do exist, most state that user data will be collected and half warn...

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How Technology Will Transform Retirement

For the next generation of retirees, the question that will trump all others will be a simple one: How do you add life to longer lives?  As people live longer, and spend more time in retirement, the challenge will be to get more out of those years. How do you find a rewarding second career? How do...

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