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Category: health monitoring

Posted:
Nov 2, 2016

Author:
Christina

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Fitness Trackers Might Help Us Live Longer (if Only We Used Them)

Activity monitors could improve our health and extend our lives — if only we could be motivated to use them. Those are the conclusions of two new studies about the promise and perils of relying on fitness trackers to measure and guide how we move.

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‘Digital Health’ Not Just For Well-Heeled Fitness Fiends

When we hear the phrase “digital health,” we might think about our Fitbit, the healthy eating app on our smartphone, or maybe a new way to email our doctor.  But Fitbits aren’t particularly useful if you’re homeless, and the nutrition app won’t mean much to someone who struggles to pay for...

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Posted:
Sep 23, 2016

Author:
Emily S

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How Should Companies Handle Data From Employees’ Wearable Devices?

Wearable electronics, like the Fitbits and Apple Watches sported by runners and early adopters, are fast becoming on-the-job gear. These devices offer employers new ways to measure productivity and safety, and allow insurers to track workers’ health indicators and habits. For employers, the...

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The Robot Revolution in Caregiving

The game is simple, designed for a child and intended to teach users about diet and diabetes. I sit opposite Charlie, my diminutive fellow player. Between us is a touch screen. Our task is to identify which of a dozen various foodstuffs are high or low in carbohydrate. By dragging their images we...

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Elder care on-demand: why tech is setting its sights on your parents

When Alan’s wife, Toby, was diagnosed with Parkinson’s four years ago, the retired geophysicist turned to a not-for-profit in Palo Alto, California – called Avenidas Village – for guidance. Through Avenidas, Alan learned about several online platforms that connect individuals who need home care...

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Things are looking app: Mobile health apps are becoming more capable and potentially rather useful

SAVILE ROW in London is best known for producing some of the world’s finest bespoke suits. But tucked away in a quiet corner of the same street is a firm that gives tailored health advice through a smartphone app. Your.MD uses artificial intelligence to understand natural-language statements such...

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Birth Control via App Finds Footing Under Political Radar

A quiet shift is taking place in how women obtain birth control. A growing assortment of new apps and websites now make it possible to get prescription contraceptives without going to the doctor.

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Posted:
Jun 20, 2016

Author:
Remi

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Workers May Soon Have To Share Heath Data--Or Pay A Penalty

Sometime next year, you may hear about a new way to save money on your health insurance. To get the discount, you and your spouse have to join your company’s voluntary “wellness program,” the kind that typically promotes exercising more or losing weight. As part of signing up, you’re both asked to...

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Smartphone health: Apple releases software for medical apps

Apple is edging its way a little further into health care with the release of new iPhone apps that patients can use to manage their own medical conditions — from diabetes to pregnancy and even depression.  While there are hundreds of health-related apps on the market, Apple wants to put its stamp...

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As Wearables in Workplace Spread, So Do Legal Concerns

Wearable devices, like the Fitbits and Apple Watches sported by runners and early adopters, are fast becoming tools in the workplace. These devices offer employers new ways to measure productivity and safety, and give insurers the ability to track workers’ health indicators and habits.

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